UPCOMING PRODUCT
EVERYTHING STAN LEE!
INCENTIVES
THIS JUST IN!
COMIC BOOKS
TRADE PAPERBACKS
HARDCOVERS
3D SCULPTURES
CGC GRADED COMICS
LITHOGRAPHS AND POSTERS
TRADING CARDS
PRODUCT ARCHIVE
DF DAILY SPECIAL
CONTEST
The All-New Comicon.com! from comicon.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WAITING FOR TOMMY
By Richard Johnston

Adisakdi Tantimedh recent two part prestige series, JLA: AGE OF WONDER just shipped, telling a steampunk story about the origins of the JLA at the turn of the nineteenth century. Well received, it has however been a long time coming. Rich Johnston talked to this relative newcomer (though he's been doing comics for almost twenty years) about the industry, the future and how DC is changing the way it does business.

RICHARD JOHNSTON: Your recent JLA: Age Of Wonder came out very recently. Are you proud to be one of the last Elseworlds creators? ADISAKDI TANTIMEDH: Yes, I'm also proud to be one of the creators of one of the last *good* Elseworlds.

RICHARD: How has the imprint's relationship with quality been, in your opinion?
ADI: I remember in the 90s, many of them were very good, since there was genuine thought put into the stories, in books like BATMAN: HOLY TERROR and the like. Somewhere along the line, it felt like the books lost their way a bit... (more coming next) I remember that bizarre Elseworlds where all the men in the world were wiped out and Superman had to repopulate it. So you ended up with a story that was all about Superman's *sperm*! But at least that had a kind of demented quality about it.

In the last two years, there really didn't feel like much of a point to the Elseworlds books other than to put them out for the sake of it. I remember looking at JLA: ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU, and, despite the nice Steve Pugh art, thinking, "What the f**k does Dr. Moreau have to do with the JLA??" Wells' original novel was already perfectly self-contained in itself (and it wasn't even his best work), so unless you could find a way to use DC superheroes to give it an extra layer to create a new understand of both aspects, what's the point in saying a bunch of mutated animals are another version of Superman or Batman? At least with AGE OF WONDER or RED SON, there was a real attempt to engage with politics and culture through the use of the likes of Superman.

There was a distinct sense of Shark Bukakke setting in... So unless there really is a point to the story, it's probably just as well that the Elseworlds line is being put to rest.


PLANETARY: THE FOURTH MAN TPB

RICHARD: Do you think Age Of Wonder succeeded?
ADI: By and large, I think we told the story we wanted to tell and I was happy with that. Whether or not it succeeded is up to the readers to decide, I think. I did have fun writing it, though, since it felt like I was writing a BBC Historical Epic with a budget of $200 million, which is what it would've cost if it was a movie.

RICHARD: How long did the process take? From pitch to publication?
ADI: Let's see... I pitched it back in late 1999/early 2000, so it's been slightly more than three years.

RICHARD: Ouch... DC has been criticised in the past for its long gestation period, what do you think took so long?
ADI: Bear in mind there was a lot of research to do before I even started scripting, after the book was commissioned, and then there was the very extensive plotting of the story, since it was an epic that took place over 30 years with a large cast of characters. There was also the process of finding an artist, and then the artist having to do his own research in the period, which, since it involved the actual look of the fashion, architecture and technology of the period, also took a fair bit of time. The script descriptions were also very elaborate. And the pace of the artist was determined by the sheer detail he had to put in.

And let's not forget a very busy editor who was dealing with at least four, five other books at the same time. So all of that added up. I finished the final draft of the script in May 2001 and from there it was out of my hands. Suffice to say, DC, understandably, do not want any projects to take that long to come out ever again, and I certainly don't blame them.

RICHARD: It seems bizarre that the system we have means that the books were on sale for a month and then "poof", into the stratosphere. DC have made a point of saying prestige format mini-series are very hard to reprint, and collections are rare. Do you feel a sense of loss over the very ethereal nature of the work?
ADI: Definitely, and that seems to be an especially unfortunate aspect of the Industry, since there's so much brilliant work through the decades that have been lost and forgotten because of that.

Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 Continued Here...

Latest News
Updated: 09/24/18 @ 5:35 pm

1. PATRICK STEWART'S FIRST STAR TREK REVIVAL PHOTO

2. DENVER COMIC CON CHANGES NAME TO DENVER POP CULTURE CON FOR 2019

3. MARVEL REVEALS NEW UNCANNY X-MEN #1 COVER FROM JEN BARTEL

4. NYCC 2018: VALIANT REVEALS EXCLUSIVE COMICS, MORE FOR NEW YORK COMIC CON 2018

5. ‘RICK AND MORTY™’ GETS A SPECIAL DOUBLE-SIZE EDITION FOR LCSD 2018



DF Interviews
CHRISTOS GAGE



CNI Podcast
EPISODE 885 - LONDON CALLING CNI!

Reviews: Archie 1941 #1, House of Whispers #1, Newbury & Hobbes #1, The Wrong Earth #1


Newsletter Sign-up


Dynamic Forces & The Dynamic Forces logo ® and © 2018 Dynamic Forces, Inc.
All other books, titles, characters, character names, slogans, logos and related indicia are ™ and © their respective creators.
Privacy Policy